Dec
09
2009
0

Christmas is coming early…

An early Christmas for PDRater users!

An early Christmas for PDRater users!

I plan to launch a brand new calculator service tomorrow.1

I think you’re really really going to like it.

Want a hint?

It’s going to help you with a case that rhymes with “Schmogilvie.”

  1. Photo courtesy of The School House []
Nov
12
2009
0

Ogilvie: Building the Case Part I

Building the case for a DFEC rebuttal

Q: How do you build the case for a DFEC rebuttal? A: One step at a time.

There’s a lot of conflicting information about what Judge’s are requiring to making a finding of a DFEC rebuttal under Ogilvie v. City and County of S.F.1  The Board in Ogilvie II is explicit that all you need is post-injury earnings information for the injured worker and similarly situated employees and “simple mathematical calculations with that wage data” using a “non-complex formula.”2

Unfortunately, calling a process “simple” and “non-complex” doesn’t necessarily make it so.  Apparently some Judges are requiring some additional showing beyond wage data and “simple calculations.”

What are Judges in your area requiring?

  • Just wage data and calculations?3
  • Vocational testimony/evidence regarding earnings?
  • Proof of attempts to seek employment/motivation?
  • Something else?

Share your insight with an e-mail or comment.

  1. Photo courtesy of eliaspunch []
  2. Ogilvie II, p1-2. []
  3. Perhaps just a print-out from PDRater?  ;) []
Sep
09
2009
1

Is Ogilvie II worse for Defendants than Ogilvie I?

Dont cry - you had a good run

Don't cry - you had a good run

You may not want to hear this, but Ogilvie II is probably worse for Defendants than Ogilvie I.  1  Check out page 32:

if within five years of the date of injury it later becomes clear that the employee’s individualized proportional earnings loss is significantly higher or lower than anticipated, a party may seek to reopen the issue of permanent disability by challenging the originally used DFEC adjustment factor.

I think we can expect to see a petition to reopen on any case that settled prior to 2/3/2009. 2

  1. Photo courtesy of Lawrence Whittmore []
  2. February 3, 2009 is the day Ogilvie I came out. []
Aug
07
2009
6

Ogilvie: You’re working too hard

lincolnblues

Even this guy can do the Ogilvie adjustment calculation in his head

If you’re using my Ogilvie calculator for situations involving a 100% earnings loss, you’re working too hard1

If you have 100% earnings loss and WPI less than 45, the Ogilvie adjustment formula will always result in WPI + 18.

Not to worry.  I can make Ogilvie even easier:

  1. [Download not found].
  2. [Download not found]!

The Ogilvie mathematical proof has been available for several weeks for peer review.  I’ve only received positive feedback.2  The above Ogilvie Adjustment Chart has been testing by myself and other workers’ compensation attorneys, but like everything else on this site is provided subject to all legal disclaimers.

Here’s a peek at what they look like:

Ogilvie Mathematical Proof

Ogilvie Mathematical Proof

Ogilvie Adjustment Chart

Ogilvie Adjustment Chart

  1. Photo courtesy of lincolnblues []
  2. An anonymous source from the DWC actually called it “cool”! []
Aug
06
2009
0

Ogilvie: the finger pointing begins

I think we can dispense with the caption, just this once...

I think we can dispense with the caption, just this once...

A defense attorney friend of mine called me up yesterday to say (I’m paraphrasing here), “You jackass.  Thanks to your Ogilvie proof every Applicant’s attorney I know is calling me up, gloating, and asking for 18 points on top of the whole person impairment on every case!  Why the hell did you do that???”1   My first thought was of my favorite quote from Swingers.2 What I actually said was something along the lines of:

For the moment, let’s set aside the issue of whether California’s injured workers have gotten a raw deal since SB899.  Suppose there’s an injured worker with a finger injury, stays on temporary disability for two years, and is immediately made permanent and stationary.  If instead they get a 0% WPI, they get nothing.  If they gets a 1% WPI, Ogilvie tells us this person gets a DFEC adjusted WPI of 19%.

Nearly every litigated case involves an extended period of temporary disability and a whole person impairment less than 45.4  Ogilvie effectively removes the first 18% permanent partial disability levels.

I really don’t think the WCAB intended this consequence.  Don’t get upset with me – as long as Ogilvie is the law I might as well make Ogilvie calculations easy for you, right?5

  1. Photo courtesy of giuliomarziale []
  2. Just for you Ray! []
  3. And save $129.99 in the process []
  4. Hell, a permanent irreversible coma is only a WPI of 80. []
  5. Remember, just add 18 to the WPI! []

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