Dec
05
2011
0

Lots of updates!

Finally!  An up date!

Look up! Dates!

A few weeks ago I e-mailed an Applicant attorney friend of mine[1] and got back a one word response.  I jokingly chided him for being so chatty.  His response was thus:

No new blog = minimal response

Well, for Z and everyone else out there, here’s a new blog post![2]  Over the weekend I updated several aspects of the website. [3]  Here’s a short summary:

  1. Updated MPN / Medical Provider Lists.  I’ve added a lot more MPN names, links, and passwords.  If you have some new ones, please send them over.  I’ve also improved the link structure to help prevent broken links.
  2. Updated workers’ compensation calculators.  I’ve added a few small features that should make the calculators work a little better.
  3. Improved site speed.  I’ve added a little extra website-internet-magic-mojo that should improve the entire site’s performance.
  4. Something new!  I’m working on a brand new calculator.  If you like playing with calculators, kicking-tires, and dishing out criticism, drop me a line and ask to be a beta tester.
  5. Finally, if you see any weirdness over the next few days, please drop me a line and let me know so I can take care of it!

But, enough about me!  How are you?

  1. I’ll call him “Z.” []
  2. There are two kinds of blog posts I really hate to read.  Blog posts that apologize for infrequent posting and blog posts that talk about the frequency of blog posts. []
  3. Photo courtesy of Agent Smith []
Written by Jay Shergill in: Medical Provider Network,PDRater | Tags: , ,
Jul
29
2011
0

Reversed! Ogilvie v. City and County of San Francisco

It's been a wild ride

It's been a wild ride

Just over a month after oral argument the Court of Appeal has issued their ruling, reversing the en banc decisions of the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board, annulled the award of permanent disability to Ms. Ogilvie, and remanding the case for further proceedings. [1]

So, what does this new Ogilvie decision mean for us?

  1. The calculations from the en banc decisions of Ogilvie I/II are no longer valid.
  2. An injured worker can still rebut a scheduled rating in accordance with [Download not found] and [Download not found].
  3. An injured worker may rebut a scheduled rating in one of three ways:
    1. Demonstrating “a factual error in the application of a formula or the preparation of the schedule.”  (Ogilvie III, p10-11).  Given the examples provided, probably references proving a defect in the [Download not found] itself.
    2. Demonstrating impairments via [Download not found]-style analysis that “the employee will have a greater loss of future earnings than reflected in a rating because, due to the industrial injury, the employee is not amenable to rehabilitation.”  (Ogilvie III, p12).  However, the increased disability must not be “due to nonindustrial factors such as general economic conditions, illiteracy, proficiency to speak English, or an employee’s lack of education.”
    3. Demonstrating “the claimant’s disability has been aggravated by complications not considered within the sampling used to compute the adjustment factor.”  (Ogilvie III, p13).  This appears to be a two-step process of having to prove a complex injury and then proving that the sample for the adjustment factor didn’t account for such injuries or complications.

Download [Download not found] aka Ogilvie III right now!

  1. Photo courtesy of mpieracci []
Jul
18
2011
0

Workers’ Compensation Specialization Boot Camp

Boot Camp

Boot Camp

The Workers’ Compensation Specialization Boot Camp on July 16 and 17 in Los Angeles was a packed house. [1]  If you missed out, there’s another chance to attend on July 30 and 31 in Concord.

If you did attend the seminar in Los Angeles, I promised you a copy of all of the cases cited during the presentation on Permanent Disability.  Here’s the basic outline along with a download link for every case I cited:

  1. Permanent Disability
    1. Cal. Labor Code. Section 4660
    2. LeBoeuf v. Workers’ Comp. Appeals Bd.
    3. Costa v. Hardy
    4. Almaraz/Guzman “II”
    5. Guzman “III”
    6. Ogilvie “II”
    7. (Updated 7/29/2011!) [Download not found]
      1. Read a summary of Ogilvie III here!
    8. Argonaut Ins. v. Ind. Acc. Comm (Montana)
  2. Psychiatric Injuries
    1. Cal. Labor Code Section 3208.3
    2. Dept. of Corrections v. Workers’ Comp. Appeals Bd. (Garcia)
  3. Apportionment
    1. Cal. Labor Code Section 4662
    2. Cal. Labor Code Section 4663
    3. Cal. Labor Code Section 4664
    4. Cal. Labor Code Section 3213 – 3213.2
    5. Escobedo v. Marshall’s
    6. Benson v. Workers’ Comp. Appeals Bd.
    7. Brodie / Welcher
  4. Rating
    1. Blackledge v. Bank of America
    2. Policy & Procedures Manual of the WCAB
  5. (Updated 7/18/2011!) Flash Card Take Away
    1. Please register for a free account with PDRater.com to download this file.
    2. Seriously – free as in free.  There’s no charge, no credit card anything.
  1. Permanent Disability

    1. Cal Labor Code § 4660

    1. Description of disability

    1. 1997 Permanent Disability Rating Schedule

      1. Rebutting the 1997 Permanent Disability Rating Schedule

      1. LeBeouf

    1. 2005 Permanent Disability Rating Schedule

      1. Permanent Impairment

      1. Rebutting the 2005 Permanent Disability Rating Schedule

      1. Costa/Harding

      1. Almaraz/Guzman II

      1. Guzman “III”

      1. Ogilvie II

  1. Photo courtesy of jumpinjimmyjava []
Mar
30
2011
0

Statistical Models

Math: The best kind of witness

Math: The best kind of witness

Yesterday the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argument on a 10 year old sexual discrimination law suit brought against Wal-Mart.[1]  I was listening to a summary of the oral argument yesterday when I heard this:

Scalia added that if statistical models can replace witnesses and evidence, “we must have a pretty bad judicial system.”

I was driving at the time just about lost it.  Replacing witnesses and evidence with statistical models?  Oh, Judge Scalia, you’ve clearly never practiced in Workers’ Compensation…

  1. Photo courtesy of colodio []
Feb
17
2011
0

Old versus New Schedule

Now THAT's an old schedule case!

Now THAT's an old schedule case!

I heard the best workers’ compensation joke yesterday. [1]  Here goes:

  • “Is this an old or new schedule case?”
  • “Of course it’s old schedule.  Just look how old it is!”
  1. Photo courtesy of dklimke []

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